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of thought formed his spell language. His chrysalis learned to respond to the spell language, and when he received his implants, this knowledge was passed to them through the old implant at the base of his skull.

Galen's spell language was that of equations. Elric had been concerned at first as Galen's language had developed. Most spell languages were more instinctive, less rigid, less rational. But Galen wasn't a holistic, lateral thinker who jumped from one track to another, drawing instinctive connections. His thoughts plodded straight ahead, each leading logically and inexorably to the next. Elric had expressed fear that Galen's language would be cumbersome and inflexible. Yet as Elric had worked with Galen on the language and seen how many spells Galen had been able to translate, his reservations had seemed to fade.

Translation was one of the most difficult tasks facing any mage. It was only after looking at many spells that Galen was able to understand how another mage's spell language related to his, then translate those conjuries. He had managed to translate most of Wierden's and Gali-Gali's spells, as well as many spells of other mages. With different levels of success, he had translated spells to create illusions, to make flying platforms, to conjure defensive shields, to generate fireballs, to send messages to other mages, to control the sensors that would soon be implanted into him, to access and manipulate data internally, to access external databases, and much more.

He had memorized them all.

But since each spell language possessed its own inherent strengths and weaknesses, he found it impossible to translate some spells, such as those for healing. Others, such as the spells used to generate defensive shields, he believed he had translated correctly,
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